in and around the lab

it's mostly science. articles, news, videos, links and random notes by a Hungarian molecular biologist.

ilovecharts:

This is the Best Presentation Ever Given

skunkbear:




Hair straightener, by Amber Kates
That hair isn’t on fire. And the hair straightener isn’t smoking. We’re actually seeing changes in air density caused by the rising heat. Our eyes wouldn’t pick up on any of this. We would just see clear air — in other words, nothing.
Here are a few more images like it — all created by Rochester Institute of Technology students for a science photography assignment, and all showing patterns of air flow.

Candle, by Andrew Kempchinskey / Lighter, Shaun McConnaghy

Burning hand sanitizer, by Nick Neumann / Marshmallow, by Benjamin Davis
These last two visualize flow that isn’t caused by heat:

Golf ball, by Joseph DeMartino / Soda, by Jena Pedersen
Here’s how these images were made:

The technique has a fancy, partly-German name: Schlieren Flow Visualization. It can be used reveal any change in air density.  Engineers use it to test the aerodynamics of different vehicles, like this YT-1300 light freighter:

Michael Hargather
Looking at these videos got me thinking: Sound is just a moving compression wave. It creates areas of more dense air and less dense air.  Could I use this technique to SEE sound?
Stay tuned for the answer!

skunkbear:

Hair straightener, by Amber Kates

That hair isn’t on fire. And the hair straightener isn’t smoking. We’re actually seeing changes in air density caused by the rising heat. Our eyes wouldn’t pick up on any of this. We would just see clear air — in other words, nothing.

Here are a few more images like it — all created by Rochester Institute of Technology students for a science photography assignment, and all showing patterns of air flow.

imageimage

Candle, by Andrew Kempchinskey / Lighter, Shaun McConnaghy

imageimage

Burning hand sanitizer, by Nick Neumann / Marshmallow, by Benjamin Davis

These last two visualize flow that isn’t caused by heat:

imageimage

Golf ball, by Joseph DeMartino / Soda, by Jena Pedersen

Here’s how these images were made:

The technique has a fancy, partly-German name: Schlieren Flow Visualization. It can be used reveal any change in air density.  Engineers use it to test the aerodynamics of different vehicles, like this YT-1300 light freighter:

Millenium Falcon

Michael Hargather

Looking at these videos got me thinking: Sound is just a moving compression wave. It creates areas of more dense air and less dense air.  Could I use this technique to SEE sound?

Stay tuned for the answer!

(via thescienceblog)

Chilly lab mice skew cancer studies

.. “in mice housed at room temperature, tumour growth was faster than in those housed at 30 °C, and immune responses to cancer were suppressed.” ..

thenewenlightenmentage:


10 incredible microscopic GIFs
Every day, life is going about its business, but we can only see a fraction of the organisms around us with the naked eye. Bacteria, protists, and tiny multicellular creatures live in a world that is completely alien to us and only visible through the microscope. Thanks to the wonder of science, we can dive into this world and see how these wee beasties get along. Here are 10 of the coolest in GIF form. Click the gallery to see each one of the glitches and then check out the full explanations of each animations below, without your browser being weighed down by all those hefty GIFs!
See Slideshow

thenewenlightenmentage:

10 incredible microscopic GIFs

Every day, life is going about its business, but we can only see a fraction of the organisms around us with the naked eye. Bacteria, protists, and tiny multicellular creatures live in a world that is completely alien to us and only visible through the microscope. Thanks to the wonder of science, we can dive into this world and see how these wee beasties get along. Here are 10 of the coolest in GIF form. Click the gallery to see each one of the glitches and then check out the full explanations of each animations below, without your browser being weighed down by all those hefty GIFs!

See Slideshow

(via scinerds)